Surveillance

H.R.387 – Email Privacy Act

Official Title as Introduced:

To amend title 18, United States Code, to update the privacy protections for electronic communications information that is stored by third-party service providers in order to protect consumer privacy interests while meeting law enforcement needs, and for other purposes.

Partial Text:

“SEC. 3. Amendments to required disclosure section.

Section 2703 of title 18, United States Code, is amended—

(1) by striking subsections (a) through (c) and inserting the following:

“(a) Contents of wire or electronic communications in electronic storage.—Except as provided in subsections (i) and (j), a governmental entity may require the disclosure by a provider of electronic communication service of the contents of a wire or electronic communication that is in electronic storage with or otherwise stored, held, or maintained by that service only if the governmental entity obtains a warrant issued using the procedures described in the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure (or, in the case of a State court, issued using State warrant procedures) that—

“(1) is issued by a court of competent jurisdiction; and

“(2) may indicate the date by which the provider must make the disclosure to the governmental entity.”

Bill explanation via the App ‘Countable’:

“This bill would require law enforcement agencies to get a warrant before digging into your information from Internet service providers… Investigating parties would also have to give a copy of the warrant to the customer they are checking out ten days in advance. The government can, however apply for an order to extend the period of time before the customer is informed. The bill does not prevent government officials from obtaining information about a person’s location.”

Advertisements

Surveillance

H.R.701 – SPY Car Study Act of 2017

Short Titles as Introduced:

SPY Car Study Act of 2017
Security and Privacy in Your Car Study Act of 2017

Official Title as Introduced:

To direct the Administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to conduct a study to determine appropriate cybersecurity standards for motor vehicles, and for other purposes.

Summary:

Shown Here:
Introduced in House (01/24/2017)

Security and Privacy in Your Car Study Act of 2017 or the SPY Car Study Act of 2017

This bill requires the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to conduct a study to determine and recommend standards for the regulation of the cybersecurity of motor vehicles manufactured or imported for sale in the United States. The study shall identify:

  • isolation measures that are necessary to separate critical software systems that can affect the driver’s control of the movement of the vehicle from other software systems;
  • measures that are necessary to detect and prevent or minimize anomalous codes, in vehicle software systems, associated with malicious behavior;
  • techniques that are necessary to detect and prevent, discourage, or mitigate intrusions into vehicle software systems and other cybersecurity risks in motor vehicles; and
  • best practices to secure driving data about a vehicle’s status or about the owner, lessee, driver, or passenger of a vehicle that is collected by the electronic systems of motor vehicles; and
  • a timeline for implementing systems and software that reflect such measures, techniques, and best practices.

Surveillance

H.R.709 – We Are Watching You Act of 2017

Official Title as Introduced:

To provide for notification to consumers before a video service collects visual or auditory information from the viewing area and to provide consumers with choices that do not involve the collection of such information, and for other purposes.

Summary:

Introduced in House (01/27/2017)

We Are Watching You Act of 2017

This bill prohibits an operator of a video service from collecting visual or auditory information from the vicinity of the device used to display the video programming stream to the consumer unless the operator: (1) displays, as part of the stream, a message that reads, “We are watching you”; and (2) describes to the consumer the types of information that will be collected and how such information will be used.

The description of information collection must be provided: (1) as part of the terms and conditions to which the consumer must agree before using the video service; and (2) in the case of a video service accessed through a device sold or provided to the consumer by the operator, as part of the written instructions and other materials accompanying such device.

Operators must offer an alternative video service that does not involve the collection of such information but is otherwise identical. Any devices provided in connection with such alternative service must be incapable of collecting such information.

Operators may disclose such information only with the express consent of the consumer or as required by a court order in connection with a law enforcement investigation.

Violations of this bill are to be treated as unfair or deceptive acts or practices under the Federal Trade Commission Act.

Defense

H.R.114 – Social Media Screening for Terrorists Act of 2017

This bill requires the Department of Homeland Security to search all public records, including Internet sites and social media profiles, to determine if an alien applying for admission to the United States is inadmissible under the Immigration and Nationality Act.